Prop. 30 – if it fails, who’ll be cryin’?

Nov 01, 2012 No Comments by

Will California’s voters approve an infusion of funds for the state’s schools, colleges and universities? The matter goes to the voters on Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 6. If approved, California’s Proposition 30 will temporarily increase income taxes on earnings of more than $250,000 for seven years, and will also increase sales taxes by a quarter-cent for four years. The measure is designed to address a funding gap in the state education budget and will provide additional funds for public schools and state colleges and universities throughout California. According to the California Voter Information Guide, Proposition 30 will increase state revenue over the next few years. It will also prevent spending reductions planned in state education programs in the coming fiscal year.  The University of California Berkeley Alumni support Proposition 30, because without state expected revenue, the university will inevitably see tuition rise, a smaller freshman class each year, and fewer internships and jobs for students.

“Proposition 30 is an opportunity for the people themselves to not only fix California, but to send a message to the rest of the country that we as a people can invest together in our schools.” — Governor Jerry Brown

On Oct. 16, at UCLA Gov. Jerry Brown campaigned to persuade students to vote for Proposition 30. He said, “Proposition 30 is an opportunity for the people themselves to not only fix California, but to send a message to the rest of the country that we as a people can invest together in our schools.”

Predictably, conservative taxpayers and business organizations oppose Proposition 30, including the Howard Jarvis Taxpayer Association, the Voice of Small Business and the Small Business Action Committee. According to the website, stopprop30.com critics of the measure say it provides no real reform for California’s public schools, community colleges or universities.

There is also a competing measure on the ballot, Proposition 38, which would raise taxes even further than Proposition 30 and restrict revenues so that they do not pass through state coffers but instead go straight to schools. Millionaire attorney, Molly Munger, is funding the campaign for Proposition 38 and has run attack ads bashing Proposition 30. According to recent polling, Proposition 38 has caused support for Proposition 30 to drop to 49.5 percent. Election clerk Dan Miller of the Marin County Elections Department says, Proposition 30 needs to get more than 50 percent to pass.

It is predicted that the vote will be close and the result may not even be known until weeks after the Nov. 6 election date when all the ballots from absentee voters can be processed, counted and qualified. If Proposition 30 fails to pass, it will trigger nearly $6 billion in automatic cuts to the education budget, a reduction that would have a drastic impact on schools, teachers and students.

News, Politics and Elections, State

About the author

Kathryn Torralva is a freshman communications and media studies major with a background in journalism and informative writing. Her career goal is to become a newspaper journalist or a web based news reporter. She is dedicated to informing readers and reporting stories relevant to the community and students alike.
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