Tools of civilization reinterpreted at Alemany art show

Sep 27, 2012 No Comments by

SAN RAFAEL Calif.—Fanciful and provocative sculptures ranging from sports equipment to weapons of war are currently on display at the art exhibition, “A Historical Narrative: A Survey through Objects and Collectables,” which opened on September 13, 2012 at Dominican University of California’s Archbishop Alemany Library.

Oversized medallions, coins, a variety of tools and weapons, and even a miniature airplane, were just some of the attention-grabbing pieces by artist Ken Kalman.

(Photo/L. Stampfli)
From left: Artist Ken Kalman, wife Robin Burnstein and Art Professor Foad Satterfield hang show on September 4, 2012.

Working in copper, bronze and aluminum, Kalman firmly believes that all humans are storytellers and historians, and has a deep commitment to exploring and crafting works of art that achieve a unique experience for the viewer.

When asked why he decided to show his work here at Dominican instead of the usual commercial gallery, Kalman replied, “I love showing at universities, just because of the different atmosphere and experience college students bring to the pieces. Here it’s all about the ideas and experience.”


“I love showing at universities, just because of the different atmosphere and experience college students bring to the pieces. Here it’s all about the ideas and experience.”

— Ken Kalman, artist


His pieces are very unique. While coins and stamps are markers of economic society, the weapons he designed are covered in maps reflecting a point in time that was connected by either geography or civilization.

(Photo/K.Torralva)
Creative facsimiles the modern day Sub Machine gun and the M240 are displayed at Ken Kalman’s Art show “A Historical Narrative: A Survey through Objects and Collectables.”

His impressive M1 carbine semi-automatic rifle out of copper and aluminum and wrapped in maps of Polish cities to represent the German invasion of Poland in the late 1930s. Kalman feels that we create and preserve items in the hope of being able to hold on to a piece of history itself though a tangible object such as a coin or a stamp.

Making these artifacts is no easy task, his artistic process involves research and detailed sculpting and metal shaping, and finishing with specific tools. Everything is detail oriented and even minor errors can lead to a fatal problem or having to start all over from the drawing board.

 

 

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About the author

Kathryn Torralva is a freshman communications and media studies major with a background in journalism and informative writing. Her career goal is to become a newspaper journalist or a web based news reporter. She is dedicated to informing readers and reporting stories relevant to the community and students alike.
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